"Suffering the Slings and Arrows of Outrageous Fortune"

Part 1 can be read here.

As we waited to get to the concussion experts – and fortunately we did not have to wait long – Emily’s concussion symptoms remained concerning. She is having trouble reading and comprehending, she struggled to write – to spell and remember the mechanics of language. As we passed the 3 week mark of her head injury, she was not getting better and, while she was perhaps not getting worse, more deficits were being revealed. I am not sure we even know the extent of her deficits at this point. When she is searching for a specific word, we go through a very entertaining version of verbal charades where she tries to make me understand what she is trying to say, with sometimes hard to follow logic and obscure literary references. Yesterday, she tried to use a story from the Little House on the Prairie books, to get to the word “fraternize”. We got there but, man, it was a circuitous journey! As always, we are still able to laugh at ourselves and the situation.

At the Concussion Clinic, we saw a rehab doctor, a neurologist and a doctor who I believe was a fellow, which is very common in our experience at Children’s. The exam revealed that her short term memory is crap, to put it plainly. She was given 3 words to remember. Maybe 5 minutes later she was able, with some effort, to pull up the first one, “green”. She was eventually able to guess the second word, “liberty” when given a prompt that it was another word for freedom. She could not recall the third, “automobile” even when given a prompt that it was a word for getting around. She guessed “car”, was told it was something like that and guessed “bus”. She remembered the word when he said it. She also took a fair amount of time to be able to say when her birthday is, which is not normal and is something she answers every single time she is at the doctor.

Her balance is off – she struggled to walk a straight line. Her eyes are not right – she either showed nystagmus or saccadic oscillations/ interruptions. (Her eyes were jerky when tracking side to side; I was able to clearly see them from where I was sitting. There was some discussion about this – I was familiar with nystagmus but had to look up “saccadic”. I was able to do so, even though it was a totally unfamiliar word, because we had a funny moment when Emily thought the doctor called her “psychotic”, “saccadic” does sound similar. He laughed and told her he would never call her psychotic to her face. We liked him quite a bit. 🙂 So, I was able to find what they said, I just don’t know the significance of it.)

So, they all agree that she did have a concussion and she has post concussive symptoms. Likely the fact that she (probably) had a CSF leak made her brain extra vulnerable to injury at the time because there was less cushion to protect it. They were concerned with the Diamox contributing to her CSF volume, but she was not taking it at the time of her injury. It was a day or two later that she started taking it again. They have referred us to speech therapy where they will assess her and do cognitive therapy to help get her brain back in shape. We are going to do that at our local hospital and they were fine with that. We will go back in a month and they will do neuropsych testing to further evaluate her, particularly if therapy is not helping as much or as quickly as we would like.

They were understandably concerned with the number of meds she is on. Frankly, they can join the club. Of course we are concerned and, yet, this is what has made her functional and removing any of them seems insane. They didn’t push that and said they would not mess with her meds since she has other docs overseeing them. I was thankful for that. Very thankful. Particularly that they left the Diamox alone.

The neurologist, through no fault of her own, should have come with a trigger warning. She was nice enough but she had the same basic advice that we got at the headache clinic at Cincy 4 years ago: eat your vegetables and drink your milk. Once again, her point is absolutely correct, as it was 4 years ago. Eating well and nourishing your body is vital to wellness. Unfortunately, that gets a little complex when one has a handful of medical conditions that make eating/digesting hard. Furthermore, when we mention that Emily is lactose intolerant and that detail is ignored because it goes against their standard protocol, it makes her a little tiny bit furious. That day, she was exhausted, hurting, scared and now this “chick” is telling her to drink milk. That said chick was a little heavy on barking orders and light on (visible) compassion did not help. Em has a, ahem,  less than favorable view of her but, I know she was just doing her job. And we have the same goal – to help Em. Once they left Em let loose about her and didn’t even laugh at my favorite medical joke: How are God and a neurologist different? God doesn’t think he is a neurologist. She did say she wanted to go give her neurologist at home a hug for not being a jerk and taking good care of her. And, presumably not telling her to drink milk.

We were suitably impressed with them over all; I feel like she is in good hands. However, I am not sure they truly understand her complexity. My guess is they don’t see a ton of (diagnosed) EDS patients in their clinic and so would have little reason to be familiar with it. I mean, you can understand the general mechanics of connective tissue and not fully grasp the entirety of what EDS will do to a person or how the simplest thing is a huge challenge.

They knew her shoulder was bad, she was wearing a sling – the MRI report was in her records, but it was like they didn’t quite grasp how unstable it is, how much it hurts and how much the CRPS pain affects her. The Rehab Doc was concerned over the tightness/knots in her neck and shoulders, because that typically is seen with concussions and contributes to the headache. What we were not able to really communicate is that that is not new – that is her baseline. And when we relieve those knots or muscle spasms, the adjoining joints often are unstabilized. Could that tension be contributing to her “concussion headache”? Sure. Is it going to be easily managed? Probably not. He wanted her to do a few stretches, some of which she cannot do because of her shoulder. In the end, he told us to talk to her PT and have him work on addressing it. The PT was incredulous that the doc would have her doing anything with her hypermobile neck and said, “Look, I don’t want to tell you to he is wrong, but don’t do any of that. We have to protect your neck. And you can tell him I said so.”

Once again, we are trying to navigate this ocean of conflicting advice. We just do our own research, try to know what we need to know and make an educated decision. We tend to go with the advice that makes the most sense at any given time and aligns the most with our understanding of all of the pieces of the puzzle. We also tend to go with the advice from the professionals who know her best.

So, the situation is at least as serious as I feared and perhaps more. It was really hard to see her struggle and see the fear and frustration on her face when asked to do a task she couldn’t do. But, concussions can take months to recover from and it is entirely possible that we will see her brain heal spontaneously over the next few weeks. Therapy will help and my husband, as always, has handpicked the best therapist for Em and her situation. We are optimistic and hopeful that she will get better in the near future.

 

 

Continued in Part Three: Shoulder…. Because that is a thing. Just not quite as big a thing as her brain.

 

 

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