"Suffering the Slings and Arrows of Outrageous Fortune"

Every once in a while, amid utter frustration and continual wearing down by the whole medical system, we get a win. Perhaps not a huge victory in the big scheme of things and there are certainly bigger battles looming. There are lots of ups and downs on this journey, even with doctors we like and respect, and that makes for a bumpy ride. But, when we actually have a great experience, especially when we weren’t expecting it, it gives us strength to keep going.

Em’s follow up with the Cardiology Syncope Clinic this past week is a good example of such a time. She has been seen in the Syncope Clinic for 3 years or so. We like the doctor, although for a while now, we have felt a growing  ambivalence about him and her treatment. So often, what we have experienced, even at Cincinnati Children’s is a subtle communication that it is all EDS and there just isn’t much to do outside their carefully constructed box of best practices. When we threw CRPS at the docs down there, everyone we saw just kind of said, “Oh, that is too bad. Not sure what to tell you. Good luck!” So, as much as I like some of the doctors, we don’t always feel  like we are getting anywhere. That is not a big deal when things are going well, but when things are not going well and you need help, it is a very big deal.

We went into this appointment, with rather low expectations and fully expecting it would be like the most recent follow ups: the nurse would ask a bunch of questions, we would see the doc for maybe 10 minutes, he would say increase your meds if you need to and we would be on our way.

Em was exhausted and feeling awful. It is a twoish hour trip and she doesn’t travel well on a good day and getting up early just makes it a not at all good day. She was in a lot of pain and her head was hurting. She had one seizure in the car on the way. She typically has little patience for being asked a ton of pointless questions and being treated like a statistic rather than a living, breathing person who is suffering. (This isn’t necessarily how she IS being treated but definitely how she perceives it.) On Wednesday, she had even less patience than usual and was ready to let somebody have it, even if it was undeserved or unwise.

As the mom, I always feel like I am walking a mine field between Emily, who is rightfully sick and tired of being sick and tired, and doctors who have an awful lot of power over us and who just don’t quite “get it”. I was just thankful they didn’t make her do the questionnaire like in the past: if they had tried, there would have been a visible mushroom cloud over Cincinnati and the news would have reported that the epicenter of the explosion was on the 4th floor of location C at Children’s.

So, the appointment proceeded as usual – the very sweet nurse took all of the info of what had been happening since we had seen them a year ago. There was an awful lot to share so it took awhile. Then we were informed that we would be seeing the Nurse Practitioner, instead of the doctor. We weren’t sure if that would be a good thing or a bad thing because we had never seen her before, so we were both sort of “meh” about it. Honestly, with our recent luck, we had little reason to expect much good.

Martha popped into the room with a smile and introduced herself. She talked about how to tweak Emily’s medicine to make it work a little better. We talked about Em seeing the doctor at OSU in a couple weeks and she put any med changes in our hands in light of seeing him. We could stay the course with Midodrine, increasing it for now. Or we could add something, although she was a little reluctant in light of everything going on and not wanting to muddy the waters for the new doc. And, she said, if we get to him and he wants to add a med but wants them to follow up with it, to just call and it will be no problem. We opted to increase her Midodrine for now but hold off on beta blockers, etc until we talk to him. It was refreshing to be given options and allowed to choose the best course.

She actually gave some practical advice – if support stocking are painful and hard to wear, abdominal binders might be better/ easier and even wearing spanx (bicycle length) can help. Further, she suggested wearing two pairs of leggings (she and I are both of an age that once upon a time called them stretch pants and we both chuckled about that) – that doubling them up may give enough compression that it could help. She was quick to point out this was not supported by any medical data, but that people have found it useful. She and Dr. Grubb’s  NP, Barbara, share ideas so I know she is getting information from a very reliable source. These ideas may or may not help Em, but the point is she was trying to offer practical solutions rooted in the real world, not some medical fantasy land.

Speaking of medical fantasy land, the  current recommendations from Genetics and Cardiology for improving EDS and POTS, is 30 minutes of exercise a day. This exercise should have the heart rate elevated but cannot be done from an upright position. So, something like a rowing machine or recumbent bike. They apparently have had good results and if Em were well enough, we would probably be eager to try this. But, after the CRPS started and she had ear infections and a concussion and lumbar puncture and blood patch  and now seizures, this just is not feasible. Martha recognized that and didn’t even give us the speech. She just suggested Em try to stand for a couple minutes, leaning against the wall and do a few modified squats each day, careful not to dislocate her knees.

When I asked if it would be wise to do some blood work to check Em’s electrolytes in light of her seizures and needing to figure out what is causing them and maybe rule some things out, she said the blood work wouldn’t be very useful to HER but if I wanted it for the OSU doc and for when we see the epileptologists, she would order it. So she went down the list of options and ordered everything that might be helpful. When we were ready to leave, the nurse brought the printed orders to me (we can’t have blood work done there, have to do it at home thanks to insurance) I suddenly recalled that the electronic signature they use isn’t sufficient for our hospital – they always have to call and get a signature faxed and it is generally a pain in the butt. So, I apologetically asked if she could sign it by hand. But, since there were about a billion (give or take) separate orders, the nurse said she would have to sign each one. I hated to bother her with that since she had spent so much time with us already, but the nurse said it wasn’t a problem and Martha signed each order for us.

She was just so kind and supportive – inquiring about Em’s mental health and morale in a way that was genuinely  caring and not clinical or intrusive. Far more than the electronic questionnaire that asks Em to rate how often she has felt depressed via a rubric of Never, Occasionally, Often, or Always.

And, when we were wrapping up the appointment, she wanted to know if there was anything else she could do for us.  I had a request that was a little odd for a cardiology visit and probably would not have asked if we had seen the doc instead of the NP. Em’s ear has been hurting a lot again. We weren’t sure if it is just being aggravated by her jaw or if it was actually infected again. Getting an emergency appointment with the ENT is challenging so if it is not visibly infected, well, maybe we just wait and see.

When I explained all that and asked if she would just peek in that ear and give us some guidance, she had no problem doing so. She looked in both ears, then in that misbehaving right one for a long time. (Which is what every single person who has ever looked at her ears has done, trying to figure out what the heck they are seeing.) Finally, she grabbed a marker and drew a diagram of what she saw on the whiteboard. She saw fluid in that ear, probably not infected yet but definitely fluid, and scar tissue from what looks like a previous perforation. Her suggestion was to give the ENT a call if it keeps hurting or gets worse, which was precisely the advice I needed.

She spent about 45 minutes with us and it has been a long time since we felt so cared for, certainly down at Cincinnati. When she walked out of the room, I looked at Emily and told her we needed to kidnap Martha and keep her with us all the time. Emily, who had been ready to go in to this appointment with guns blazing, agreed completely and was laughing with me about my goofy suggestion. It is truly amazing the impact a single person can have on the people around them and how far a little kindness and support can go towards making someone who is suffering feel better about the world and giving them the strength to carry on.

I wish all appointments could be like that for EVERYONE who is in our shoes, but, since that is wishful thinking, I will just be very thankful for Martha and her kindness at a time when we really needed it.

 

Advertisements

Comments on: "Another Much Needed Win" (4)

  1. Mary Sue Claus said:

    I can only imagine the relief you both must feel! It is exhausting and exasperating to feel like the victim of the medical system, including physicians and their staff, and the insurance companies. For someone to listen, really listen, have compassion, ponder and think and then advise is a treasure. Don’t let Martha go! I hope I find a Martha one day. Prayers and blessings to you and Em.

    • We still laugh about wanting to kidnap Martha – especially since we won’t see her again for a year. I wish everyone could have at least one doctor who was so great!

      Thank you for commenting! Hang in there!

  2. Charlene Barnes said:

    What a blessing to have a very special Angel, like Martha. I’m so happy for you that you had a very positive appointment, when you were expecting the same old answers and more disappointment. I also hope I find a Martha like her someday. I have found a good Pain Clinic finally, that does listen and care. I also have a Great Wound Care /Plastic Surgeon that has many EDS patients, and has helped with the healing of a hole in my knee, after having a second knee replacement on the same knee within 7 months. I have continued praying for your daughter as I know as a Mom that I have EDS, and my 3 daughters have it also. My youngest is almost 40 and in a power wheelchair as her HEDS, is the worst of all my girls and she also doesn’t have good medical care where she lives in Michigan. She also has many other health issues and no medical help for it. She lives 500 miles away from me and I can’t travel to help her out. She is a single Mom now with my 15 year old Grandson, and my Granddaughter is 19 and away at College. Her husband was her Caregiver, but was abusing her, and is finally out of the house, and she is waiting for the County to get her another Caregiver. Hopefully soon, as she is struggling to take care of herself.
    It’s very stressful when your children are very sick. We didn’t know we had EDS until a year ago, so it’s up to us to do our own research, as it is with most of us with EDS. We have HEDS, Mast Cell, and my daughter in Mich also has POTS and possibly Chiari. She hasn’t been tested for it yet, as she has to travel a long ways to see Drs. Her Primary Care is handling most everything with her so far. She did go to a EDS Clinic at University of Mich and came home disappointed because they were no help. She needs to find a Orthopedic that might be able to fix her knees, so she can walk again. She has had 12 leg surgeries on one leg and two on the other. Lots of damage done by a Dr that kept trying., but we didn’t know that all those surgeries wasnt going to hold, because of EDS.
    Hoping and praying you get good news at your next Drs Appt and that you will get answers.
    Charlene

    • EDS is so challenging. I am sorry to hear your family is struggling so much with it. What a blessing a good, caring doctor is! It makes such a difference – gives us strength to get through the ones who aren’t so caring!

      Praying you and your girls find great doctors and all the answers you need. Thanks for commenting!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: